Posted in Book of the Week, Books: Romance, Books: Teenage Angst

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Book of the Week: Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell
Tea of the Week: Black Tea

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Excerpt:
“‘Reagan!’ the boy said happily. ‘Look, your roommate’s here.’
A girl stepped around Cath in the doorway and glanced back coolly. She had smooth, auburn hair and an unlit cigarette in her mouth. The boy grabbed it and put it in his own mouth. ‘Reagan, Cather. Cather, Reagan,’ he said.
‘Cath,’ Cath said.”

Meet Cath. Not Cather. Not Catharine. Just Cath.
Cath is a Simon Snow Fan. Don’t know who Simon Snow is? Think nerd.
Ok, but let’s be real… The entire world is a fan of Simon Snow.
Being a fangirl is what Cath excels at- it’s basically a way of living for her. She and her twin sister, Wren, were the biggest fans, but times have changed. They are both off to college, and while Wren has let go of Simon Snow, Cath is still in her comfort zone.  And with meeting new people, like her surly roommate, and her always around boyfriend, her fanfictions-hating professor, her dad who’s never been left alone and a boy who only talks about words.
Cath constatnly questions: Can she do this?  Is this really what she wants?

Fangirl. It’s by far, one of my favorite books to read, and Cath being one of my favorite characters yet. I honestly love everything about it. I love the plot, the characters, the development. I love how Cath changes from beginning to end. To me, Cath reminds me of a butterfly, and I know it sounds so cliche, but it’s true. Cath starts out as a girl who’s afraid of her own shadow, and she is hopelessly stuck in the same situation over, and over. And then with the help of her friends, and herself mostly, she begins to realize her potential, and her own needs aren’t as selfish as she thinks they are. I also love Cath, for the way Rowell wrote her as. Rowell wrote Cath as a character, a girl, with many flaws, and in the end, Cath is still a flawed being. Rowell doesn’t make her characters as the cliche “girl with so many flaws but in the end of the story she’s perfect and has a perfect life”. No. She still makes them flawed in the beginning, but throughout Fangirl, Cath realizes herself as a flawed being and she tries to fix them, or rather she does something about them.

I also love the main/side characters, such as Levi and Reagan. I love them, because there’s that point in the book where I, as a reader, realized that theses characters all have their own story, and how us, as a reader, and through Fangirl, are just getting glimpses of their story, while we are looking at another person’s story, Cath’s. And it gets me to think, how are other people’s stories like in real life? How much of ourselves are included in other people’s stories? I guess those thoughts are saved for another of my random rants.

Another thing about this book, is that since one of the main parts is how Cath is writing her own fanfiction for Simon Snow, and how she feels that it’s a race to finish her fanfiction, before the writer of the Simon SNow series finishes their last book, shows how much Cath cares about Simon Snow. I love how Rainbow Rowell gives the reader glimpses of Cath’s writing, and the author of Simon Snow’s writing.

I also realized that Simon Snow, in a way, symbolizes something different for everyone, like different memories, objects, but in the end it all has the same meaning of not wanting to grow up, and holding onto that part of yourself of your childhood, or something precious that keeps you in a safe bubble. And I think one of the ways that makes Fangirl such an amazing novel, is that it makes the reader grow up a little inside, and broaded their way of thinking and perspective.

And concluding my thought’s on Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, read it. It’s a way of living that some of us readers will understand and if you don’t, it’s fine, because it’s surely a novel that even just the tiniest thing, even just one percent of this book is relatable.

ofdragonsandtea out.

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Author:

I write, I rant and I ramble, but it's not the best.

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